Smart Technology

Like many other things in my life, my relationship with technology—and in particular smart technology—can be described as "complicated".

I'm confident I can describe myself as a tech-savvy person but I'm far from being an expert on any type of technology. My relationship with my phone is old news if you've followed my blog for a while and my other interactions with the rest of the tech items are not that much different.

I generally want my tech to be dumb but smart enough to not be frustrating to use. A good example of this is the connection between my TV and my PS4. The TV is not a smart TV. It's an old (8 years?) Samsung that is nothing more than a glorified pc monitor. But it's "smart" enough to "know" that when I turn on my PS it should also turn on and automatically switch to the correct source input.

This is an example of the kind of "smart technology" I want in my life. I'd just call this good design.

To me, it looks like we're trying to make technology smarter because teaching people how to use technology properly would be way harder.


This post is a relpy to Derek's post "Where we do and don’t want automation".